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High quality places & design contributions

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2 months ago

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Section 12: High quality places and design We suggest this section should acknowledge the strategic importance to place-making and design of the transformation of the canal and basin into the focus of working harbourside activity, interest and vitality. It would be wrong if absence of such a strategy led to the canal and basin being subordinated into a leisure destination or backdrop complement to development. The basin is one of Exeter’s special, defining spaces, the destination on the edge of the city centre of the city’s waterway to and from the sea. This gives it, we believe, a role in the place-making visions of the 2040 Plan. Design Principles The waterway and surrounds provide a source of challenge and inspiration for planning and architecture that aspires to more than attractive or merely economically viable buildings and layouts. The Plan should spell out the planning principle that the purposes of the canal and basin should not be crushed, visually or functionally, by development interests alien to the waterway. The principle should encourage building design near the waterway that is better than pastiche and does not overshadow the water’s edge. It will treat humanity equally with viability, and encourage varied and proportionate massing, rooflines, spaces and views. We believe these are strategic principles for the kind of high quality place-making the 2040 Plan strives for. D1: Design principles (Strategic policy) We suggest an additional element at ‘j’ in the strategic list to promote high quality design – j. Pay due attention in design and layout to the impact of development by the canal and basin on the ability of the waterway to function, and to the visual language and spaces of the character of the area and existing buildings; Re-letter the elements that follow.

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3 months ago

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As trustees of the Methodist Church, Sidwell Street, we are concerned that limited resources, both financial and human, put this Grade 2 * building at risk. We are aware and, and others are becoming aware, that this building is almost unique, not only in the UK, but world wide. It has superb acoustics, an excellent organ and unusual construction and architecture. We wish to register our desire to work with the Council and other agencies to preserve this building and maximise its use.

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3 months ago

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Active Design Active Design will help improve health and well-being as well as addressing climate change and promoting active travel – more walking and cycling. This has considerable understanding with the Plan including design and a liveable city. In particular: • Healthy city – vision • Live and move initiative • S1 spatial strategy • S2 liveable Exeter • CC1 Net Zero Exeter • STC1 sustainable movement • STC2 active travel in new developments • D1 design principles • HW1 Health and wellbeing Sport England, working with Active Travel England and the Office for Health Improvement and Disparities, has produced the 3rd version of ‘Active Design’ (May 2023), a guide to planning new developments that create the right environment to help people get more active, more often in the interests of health and wellbeing. The guidance sets out ten key principles for ensuring new developments incorporate opportunities for people to take part in sport and physical activity. The Active Design principles are aimed at contributing towards the Government’s desire for the planning system to promote healthy communities through good urban design. Sport England would commend the use of the guidance in the master planning process for new residential developments. The document can be downloaded via this link Sport England believes that being active should be an intrinsic part of everyone’s life pattern. Active Design has a lot of synergy with the TCPA “20 minute neighbourhood” concept. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDaVBh1Bs7Y and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRCJ4JL_LjM&list=TLPQMTIwMTIwMjS3NyOvSTN83A&index=2 The developer’s checklist (Appendix 1) has been revised and can also be accessed via www.sportengland.org/activedesign In particular new housing sites: • Marsh Barton – 1000 (site 14) • Water Lane – 1000 (site 15) • East Gate 850 (site 52) • Red Cow 280 (site 22) • North Gate 200 (site 42) • South Gate 170 (site 46) • Land at Old Rydon Lane 350 (site 89) • Land at Cowley Bridge Road 231 (site 143) • Exe Bridges Retail Park 230 (site 39) Sport England would encourage development in Exeter be designed in line with the Active Design principles to secure sustainable design. This could be evidenced by use of the checklist. MODEL POLICY FOR ACTIVE DESIGN A suggested model policy for Local Plans [and Neighbourhood Plans] is set out below: "Active Design: Model policy for Local and Neighbourhood Plans The design and masterplanning of development proposals will embrace the role they can play in supporting healthy lifestyles by facilitating participation in sport and physical activity. To do so they will, as far as is relevant to the specific development proposal, adhere to the following Active Design Principles: • Activity for all Enabling those who want to be physically active whilst encouraging those who are inactive to become active. • Walkable communities Creating the conditions for active travel between all locations. • Connected walking, running and cycling routes Prioritising active travel through safe integrated walking, running and cycling routes. • Co-location of community facilities Creating multiple reasons to visit a destination and minimising the number and length of trips and increasing the awareness and convenience of opportunities to participate in sport and physical activity opportunities. • Network of multifunctional open space Providing multifunctional spaces opens up opportunities for sport and physical activity and has numerous wider benefits. • High quality streets and spaces Well designed streets and spaces support and sustain a broader variety of users and community activities. • Appropriate infrastructure Providing and facilitating access to facilities and other infrastructure to enable all members of society to take part in sport and physical activity. • Active buildings Providing opportunities for activity inside and around buildings, rather than just between buildings. • Management and maintenance A high standard of maintenance is essential to ensure the long-term attractiveness of sports facilities along with open and public spaces. Active Design, developed by Sport England and supported by Pubic Health England, provides a set of principles for creating the right conditions within existing and proposed development for individuals to be able to lead active and healthy lifestyles. It focuses on those ingredients of cities, towns and villages that offer individuals the opportunity to be active. The planning system as a whole, including individual development proposals, has a key role to play in creating such opportunities. Planning applications will therefore be assessed against how they embrace the role they can play in supporting healthy lifestyles by facilitating participation in sport and physical activity. The Local Planning Authority will use the Active Design Principles to aid this assessment. Where Design and Access Statements are required to support an application they should explain how the design of the proposal embraces this role and reflects the Active Design Principles. Public Health leads for the local area should be encouraged to work with the planning department to engage at pre-application stage with applicants as they will be consulted on all relevant applications. The Local Planning Authority may use planning conditions and/or planning obligations where necessary to address issues where developments could, but do not, embrace this role and do not adhere to the Active Design Principles. The Active Design guidance, which provides further details for each of the Principles along with a set of case studies, can be found on Sport England’s website. " Supporting Text to the Policy is included within the Active Design guidance.

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3 months ago

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See comments submitted on behalf of Bloor

Why do you feel this way and do you have any other comments?

See comments submitted on behalf of Bloor

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3 months ago

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See comments submitted on behalf of Broom

Why do you feel this way and do you have any other comments?

See comments submitted on behalf of Broom

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